Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
KGO (ABC) 18
WMAR (ABC) 7
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
to washington. where the president called out the president of russia. about the olympics and gay rights. and a lot more. abc's chief white house correspondent jonathan karl was there. >> reporter: the president talked for the first time about canceling his meeting next month with russian president, vladimir putin, saying that despite the tension, they have a decent personal relationship. >> i know the press likes to focus on body language, and he's got that kind of slouch, looking like the bored kid in the back of the classroom. but the truth is, is that when we're in conversations together, oftentimes, it's very productive. >> reporter: the president said he is offended by russia's new anti-gay law, where foreigners could go to jail, for quote, promoting homosexuality, but when it comes to the upcoming winter olympics in russia -- >> i do no think it's appropriate to boycott the olympics. one of the things i'm really looking forward to is maybe some gay and lesbian athletes bringing home the gold, the silver, or the bronze. which i think would go a long way in rejecting in the kind of
, including women and children of this newest attack. this evening that disturbing headline from washington about what we could be looking at now. u.n. weapons inspectors are on the ground facing huge hurdles trying to determine if chemical weapons were, in fact, accused. abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz is in the region for us tonight. >> reporter: it's a terrible and urgent task. tonight the u.s. and u.n. racing to find out whether chemical weapons killed these men, women and children and just how many died. today a shocking new number from opposition groups revealed in washington. >> the most recent estimates we've seen range from 1,000 to 1800 which is obviously a broad range. >> reporter: the assad regime says the claims that it carried out a chemical attack are baseless. but the world is reacting swiftly and forcefully. as u.n. investigators beg for access to the site, the evidence may be quickly dissipating. david, tonight president obama has directed the intelligence community to do everything possible to find additional information about this suspected attack
're trying to achieve. >> martha raddatz standing watch in washington. what about the syrian response tonight? abc's terry moran in the region for that. >> reporter: in damascus today, even as u.s. leaders made their case for an attack, the civil war didn't stop. it didn't even pause. government artillery pounding away at rebel positions. the shelling hindered u.n. inspectors as they concluded their investigation. elsewhere, people just went on with their lives. the lucky ones in cafes, others lining up for bread. but in the palace and the parliament, president bashar al assad and his government remain defiant, and well-fed. "syria won't surrender," declared the speaker of parliament. and now, another atrocity. >> what happened here almost defies words. >> reporter: the bbc's ian pannell reported from the scene of what appeared to be an incendiary bomb attack, allegedly carried out by a syrian air force jet on a school. >> they arrived like the walking dead. we don't know for sure what was in the bomb but the injuries and debris suggest something like napalm or thermite. >> reporter: the sh
's chief global correspondent reports from washington. good even. >> reporter: this was a day the white house was trying to show transparency, declassifying documents about once secret nsa spying. that was immediately trumped by even more revelations of spying and an uncomfortable moment for the head of the national security agency. while national security secrets were leaking all over washington, general keith alexander was at a las vegas hackers convention facing down hecklers. >> we stand for freedom. >> reporter: the heckler took issue with that statement but the director fired back, saying congressional investigators have found no illegal activity by the nsa. >> that's not bull. those are facts. >> reporter: but today brought another blockbuster revelation, a still top secret nsa program leaked by edward snowden to a british newspaper that it says allows u.s. analysts to snoop on, quote, nearly everything a user does on the internet in real time. the guardian story provides a 32-page training guide, showing how the so called x key score program works, sucking up data from 150 sites
affairs correspondent martha raddatz reporting in from washington now. martha? >> reporter: tonight we are learning that the intercepts abc news first reported about a big strategically important attack were communications between al qaeda's main leader after osama bin laden's death and the head of al qaeda in yemen. abc news has also learned tonight why this threat that was emanating from overseas has now caused such alarm in the u.s. tonight, beefed up law enforcement, heightened awareness at airports from l.a. to new york, and more scrutiny on those trying to enter the country. a senior u.s. official tells abc news that the plot started in yemen and tonight u.s. officials are franticly searching for vehicle bombs al qaeda wants to use to blow up the u.s. embassy there and perhaps others as well. abc news has also learned that through surveillance and electronic eavesdropping more was discovered, including communications between al qaeda affiliates and someone in the u.s., not just electronic conversations but through the mail as well. the u.s. does not know the content of the letter
to ask riggs himself. he died in 1995. gio benitez, abc news, new york. >>> and up next, our washington watch dog series, looking out for waste of taxpayer dollars. tonight abc's david kerley has some tough questions about something he found, two agencies, one fish, and millions in taxpayer money. >>> reporter: dick stevens -- >> how much more do you all got to go today? >> reporter: -- is a catfish legend in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> reporter: 400,000 in one day? >> pounds, yes. >> that is a lot of fish. >> that is a lot of fish. >> reporter: he's one of the biggest catfish processors in the country and one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to inspect catfish grown here and imported. critics call that a huge waste of taxpayer money. there is one big problem. >> you already have the fda inspecting seafood. >> that's not correct. we have fda but that's a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million just for planning those inspections. while ther
york. >>> and from washington tonight, the government program spending billions of dollars in taxpayer money so everyone can work faster online. but what about the $1 million we found going to waste in just one closet. enough money to pay for dozens of teachers. our watch dog, david kerley, back on the case of the costly program. >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. and we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: to spread broadband across the country the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. take a look at this. these boxes stacked in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers. you paid for them, 20 grand each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. one and a quarter million just in this closet gathering dust for three years now, enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned othe
of segregation to come to washington, put on their sunday best to say in dignified solidarity america must change. today the koud crowd was much smaller, an estimated 30,000, the dress more casual, the sense of history still strong. there were stars on stage ♪ >> reporter: speaker after speaker touched upon the words that changed american history. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. >> reporter: king's dream may not yet be fulfilled but the president insisted america is on its way. >> to dismiss the magnitude of this progress, to suggest as some sometimes do that little has changed, that dishonors the courage and the sacrifice of those who paid the price to march in those years. >> reporter: everyone today including president obama was short on specifics, but like many of the feel good speeches 50 years ago, the hard work goes on elsewhere. diane? >> it does and seeing all those families gathered in washington today reminds everyone how much children have to l
washington about what we could be looking at now. unespecially inspector are facing huge hurdles to determine if chemicals weapons were, in fact, used. >> reporter: it's a terrible and urgent task. tonight the u.s. and un racing to find out whether chemical weapons killed these men, women and children. just how many died? today a shocking new number from opposition groups revealed in issue washington. >> the most recent sometimes we've seen range from 1,000 to 1800 which is a broad range. >> reporter: the assad regime says the claims that it carried out a chemical attack are baseless. as un investigators beg for access to the site, the evidence may be quickly dissipating. david, tonight president obama has directed the intelligence community to do everything possible to find additional information about this suspected attack, but we don't know what the u.s. response would be. david? >> martha raddatz with us again tonight. thank you. >>> also new word this evening on americans now believed to have joined the fight on the ground in syria potentially helping terrorist groups there. could those
and relaxation most americans can only see in their dreams. abc's david kerley has our washington watchdog now. >> reporter: talk about a mad dash today. members of congress leaving the capitol. grabbing their bags, heading home for a five-week vacation. gone. with time running out to pass some big pieces of the country's business, including a budget. >> when you are at work, you are working until you get it all done. then you go on vacation. >> reporter: citizens vacationing in the nation's capitol -- >> you earn your vacation from doing your job. >> reporter: -- can't believe it. >> the average working man gets two weeks' vacation. that's more than enough. they get other breaks all through the year. >> reporter: look at the calendar. once they return, the house will have just nine working days before the end of the budget year. the senate just a few more. >> oh, my goodness, the amount of stuff, the list of important things that need to be done in this congress, it is as long as my arm. >> reporter: so far this year, the senate met only 96 working days. they were out of session for 53 the ho
of an alarming and growing problem. washington d.c. police wanted to show that at just 35 miles per hour there is just a fraction of a second to react. a pedestrian is killed on our roads on average every two hours. like this jogger in charlotte, someone on a road is hurt every 8 minutes. this man suffered minor injuries, the driver who left the scene later arrested. most striking, half of pedestrian deaths involve alcohol. we're not just talking drivers. a third of the pedestrians killed, 1,500 people, were walking drunk. with a blood alcohol level of.08 or higher. >> 7 out of 10 pedestrian fatalities happen at night and often involve alcohol. >> reporter: walking drunks have become such a problem in england. watch this man falling onto the rail trucks or this man who falls onto the escalator and can't get off. this video was released as a warning of the danger of drunk walkers. weekend nights are the most dangerous times. while the majority happen in cities, it's not at intersections. what can you do? be predictable, follow the rules of the road. never assume that a driver sees you, ma
they wrapped up that night. >> this, too, shall pass. >> reporter: it did not. jon donvan, abc news, washington. >>> still ahead right here on "world news," new ways to protect your family home from thieves and the time of day burglars are most likely to strike. >>> and a young boy, a big wish and the superstar who made it happen, america strong tonight. wish and the superstar who made it happen, america strong tonight. [ whispering ] shhh. it's only a dream. and we have home insurance. but if we made a claim, our rate would go up... [ whispering ] shhh. you did it right. you have allstate claim rate guard so your rates won't go up just because of a claim. [ whispering ] are we still in a dream? no, you're in an allstate commercial. so get allstate home insurance with claim rate guard... [ whispering ] goodnight. there are so many people in our bedroom. [ dennis ] talk to an allstate agent... [ doorbell rings ] ...and let the good life in. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn,e agent... relief is at hand. for many, nexium provides 24-hour heartburn relief and may be available for
. david kerley, abc news, washington. >>> and still ahead tonight on "world news." the emotional tribute to glee's cory monteith. from his girlfriend and costar. >>> and lessons tonight for everyone with a loved one in trouble. >>> and later, a remarkable family reunion. showing us all what it means to get to live the american dream. [ male announcer ] what's important to you? at humana, our medicare agents sit down with you and ask. being active. and being with this guy. [ male announcer ] getting to know you is how we help you choose the humana medicare plan that works best for you. mi familia. ♪ [ male announcer ] we want to help you achieve your best health, so you can keep doing the things that are important to you. taking care of our customers. taking care of her. and the next thing on our list is bungee jumping. [ male announcer ] helping you... now that's what's important to us. yeah... try new alka seltzer fruit chews. they work fast on heartburn and taste awesome. these are good. told ya! i'm feeling better already. [ male announcer ] new alka seltzer fruits chews. enjoy the
got that rating. testers hope the results lead to safer cars. david kerley, abc news, washington. >>> and now the lucky winners in that powerball jackpot, $448 million. there were three winning tickets and today the owner of one of those tickets, a dad in minnesota, came forward. his family by his side. their lives about to change. here is abc's linsey davis. >> reporter: meet paul white, america's newest multi-millionaire. less than 12 hours after the drawing those 45 electrical engineer came forward to collect his share of the $485 million jackpot. >> i feel this pressure off my shoulders that you carry every day with you. i have two kids. am i going to be able to pay for them to go to college? all these things gone. >> reporter: after taxes he is $175 million richer. the remaining will be split between two mysterious millionaires, one ticket bought here in south brunswick, new jersey. there are several other newly minted millionaires today, in colorado, texas and oklahoma, powerball ticket holders earned a $2 million prize. there were $1 million winner in a total of 16 states.
make the determination, but this time it is washington ordering the embassies to close down. and while the closures right now are just for sunday, they could be extended for several days as u.s. intelligence works vigorously to get more specifics. diane? >> story still unfolding, thank you, martha raddatz. >>> also from overseas tonight guess who is leaving the airport? edward snowden who leaked government secrets walked out after 38 days in exile in the moscow terminal. he is reportedly staying with americans who live in russia. russia gave him temporary asylum for one year, a move that sent shock waves all the way to the white house briefing room. >> we see this as an unfortunate development and we are extremely disappointed by it. we've made clear there is legal justification for mr. snowden's return. >> spokesman jay carney said president obama was given no prior notice by the russians. it's unclear if president obama will meet with russian president putin as scheduled in september. >>> another story out of russia one that could rock team usa before the winter olympics begin. the r
. jonathan karl, abc news, washington. >> we bring in abc's medical editor dr. richard besser. exactly what does a stent do and what does it not do? >> this tiny little thing here is a stent. what it does do, if you have symptoms it can relieve those. what it doesn't do, if you don't have heart symptoms, it doesn't prevent a heart attack. >> it does not prevent a heart attack? we think of it as opening it up so the plaque doesn't cause a heart attack but that's wrong. >> that's right. many studies have shown if you don't have symptoms it doesn't do anything for you. if you have shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue going upstairs or strange symptoms, that's when you need to ask about getting a stress test to see if your arteries might be blocked. >> we'll be following the former president tomorrow hoping he's home. thank you again. >>> and now we turn to that shooting rampage trial under way at fort hood texas and the opening statement by army major nadal hassan who is defending himself. the former psychiatrist admitted killing 13 people and wounded dozens of others. hassan, an american
in an effort to keep it out of those little hands. abc news, lisa stark, washington. >>> tonight a high flying tragedy for the man who stole the show at the opening of the olympics in england. he joined other dare devils in a leap from the mountains today and it resulted in a fatal mistake. abc's ryan owens has that. >> reporter: he had the world holding its breath, jumping from a helicopter dressed as james bond and gliding with that union jack parachute right into olympic stadium in london last year. but mark sutton wore another kind of suit, a winged suit. what people can do in them may be as dangerous as anything 007 ever did. he even had a youtube channel to demonstrate how he could maneuver around majestic mountains. today the 42-year-old leaped from a helicopter 10,000 feet above the swiss alps and slammed into a mountain and died instantly. this man has done similar jumps hundreds of times. here he is gliding around the matterhorn. look closely and you'll see a plane flying by him. >> the people that are doing it accept the risk. if you are doing this it's because you dreamed of it. if
truman having said, "if you want a friend in washington get a dog." in general, white house canines have known their place but some have gone to the wild side like bush's barner getting annoyed at a reporter once. >> pete once tore a pant leg off the french ambassador that got him banned from the white house. also disruptive, lbj signing a meat inspection bill and up hops yuki. comeuppance perhaps for a president who hoisted his beagles like this. so why do we care sunny? well, you're the dog of a president now. and dogs make presidents more human. >> a note before we go. there is a rare blue moon tonight. you won't see one again until 2015. send us your pictures. thanks for watching. we'll see you right here tomorrow night. >>> next at 6:00 thousands of lightning strikes and more could be on the way. >> it brings danger on the ground. california wildfires burning now and red flag warning for part of the bay area. >>> a shark sighting shuts down a popular north bay beach. was it following a whale that washed up there yesterday. >> back to school sticker shock. the price of school supplie
and walmart. >>> and word tonight of a new arrival at the national zoo in washington. a giant panda gave birth to a cub this afternoon. no name yet. but mama picked up her cub immediately and started cradling it. today's birth comes as matt gutman got a look at the twin pandas in the atlanta zoo, the first twin pandas born in the u.s. in 26 years. "pandamonium" tonight. i had to. >>> so much more ahead here on "world news" this friday night. coming up with the extreme storms on the way this weekend, what happens when power lines come down on your home, on your car. tonight, how to get out alive, and get this, the floor mat in your car could save your life. >>> and later tonight here the little boy on the sidelines getting a talking to. what we learned late today about the major league coach in his face and why so many moms and dads out there will be nodding their heads when you hear what he has to say. [ male announcer ] what's important to you? at humana, our medicare agents sit down with you and ask. hanging out with this guy. he's just the love of my life. [ male announcer ] getting to know
permitting recreational use of the drug, specifically washington and colorado. the department said prosecution would not be a good use of federal funds and that decision could make it easier for other states to legalize marijuana, too. >>> now, it is considered a secret of a lot of american lives, how many people get into bed every night and take a sleeping pill. abc's linsey davis has our story. >> reporter: it appears we are a nation of insomniacs with a tendency to pop pills, desperate for some shut-eye. a new cdc report indicates about 9 million americans admit to taking a sleep drug in the past 30 days. >> are sleeping pills overprescribed in this country? >> i think they are. a lot of times people don't try other methods first. >> reporter: in fact, america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the world. >> we are 24-hour-a-day country. we're always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on facebook where people post comments like, "can't fall asleep, taking my ambie
said, "if you want a friend in washington get a dog." in general, white house canines have known their place but bush's barney got annoyed at a reporter once. >> pete once tore a pant leg off the french ambassador that got him banned from the white house. also lbj signing a meat inspection bill and up hops yuki. # comeuppance perhaps for a president who hoisted his beagles like this. so why do we care sunny? well, you're the dog of a president now. and dogs makes presidents humans. >> a note before we go. there is a rare blue moon tonight. you won't see one again until 2015. send us your pictures. thanks for watching. we'll see you right here tomorrow night. good night. >>> on "the list," grandma gets high tech. the new tablet just for seniors. is your closet suffering from multiple permits? >> shopper. >> our list of ways to clear the clutter. and it's a souvenir that saves you time. how to send a personal gift from your phone. >> happy tuesday. i'm teresa strausser. you are on "the list." the radius of the earth is 3,959 miles. and we have searched every square inch for the top
,000 every year. david kerley, abc news, washington. >>> and next, when we come back, the amazing thing stephen colbert and his famous friends did in an entertainment crutch is creating a sensation today in our "instant index" next. hard ie and man, you know how that feels. copd includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. spiriva is a once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my obstructed airways for a full 24 hours. you know, spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. does breathing with cop
to the washington monument and there was the moon pink at a baseball game in missouri and in california, the silhouette of a plane. we loved your pictures, this one from arizona and the fantastic golden moon in new jersey early in the morning. right there, a truly blue moon in north carolina. by the way, it appears blue when there is ash in the air. again, thanks. >>> when we come back, a young boy and his football hero, his smile, his touchdown dance and america strong. [ female announcer ] love. it's the most powerful thing on the planet. love holds us in the beginning. comforts us as we grow old. love is the reason you care. for all the things in your life... that make life worth living. ♪ ♪ sweet love of mine a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)